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Overall Rating: 4.9 stars - 14 reviews

By:
Date: May 23, 2021
Page Rating: (5.0/5)
Comments:
Thank you for your excellent article. I would like to install a Kahrs floating engineered wood floor in a freestanding office/workshop space that is 12x24 and will be climate controlled most, but not all of the time. There will be one cabinet filled with supplies that weighs about 1500 lbs and a small printing machine that weighs about 350 lbs. Would these equate to heavy “kitchen island style” fixed objects? There will also be a sofa and other smaller cabinets placed in the room. Is a floating floor a bad idea for this space or are there any suggestions you might have to work around these heavy items? Would a traditional 3/4" hardwood floor nailed to the subfloor (1.25” plywood) be a better choice or might that result in cupping and gaps due to relative humidity fluctuations? We are in central New York if that helps. Thank you!
By:
Date: June 29, 2020
Page Rating: (4.5/5)
Comments:
Besides recommending engineered vs hardwood, also would be nice to rank the hardwoods.
By:
Date: December 24, 2018
Page Rating: (5.0/5)
Comments:
Excellent. Comprehensive yet understandable by those outside your industry. Very professionally written.
By:
Date: February 26, 2018
Page Rating: (5.0/5)
Comments:
Very helpful. Thanks!
By:
Date: February 17, 2018
Page Rating: (4.5/5)
Comments:
Helpful info. Thanks.
By:
Date: February 14, 2018
Page Rating: (5.0/5)
Comments:
Humidity vs. flooring explained well!
By:
Date: April 8, 2017
Page Rating: (5.0/5)
Comments:
Thank you for the important information you provide on this website.
By:
Date: October 17, 2016
Page Rating: (4.5/5)
Comments:
This article has helped me immensely in trying to sort the wheat from the chaffe [so to speak] in understanding what makes up engineered flooring and the pitfalls to be aware of. I also agree that "you get what you pay for" Thank you.
By:
Date: July 23, 2016
Page Rating: (5.0/5)
Comments:
We installed narrow hardwood flooring in the 2nd floor and now have extensive cupping/unevenness.
By:
Date: May 27, 2016
Page Rating: (5.0/5)
Comments:
Your articles are fantastic! I have learned so much from your website. Thank you for going to the effort to create these informative pages.
By:
Date: April 17, 2015
Page Rating: (5.0/5)
Comments:
In addition as Jeff Hosking’s states above it is expected to see some minor movement within the wood boards in any environment but, you probably should have a certified wood flooring inspector come in to evaluate the floor to see if it can be corrected to need to be replaced. You can go to woodfloors.org to find an independent inspection company local to you.
By:
Date: April 17, 2015
Page Rating: (5.0/5)
Comments:
Michelle, I am a wood floor manufacturer and to minimize movement in wood flooring, Wood flooring is purposely manufactured to contain a 6-9 % moisture content which equals in range of what the standard normal recommended 30 – 50 % Relative Humidity level should be in healthy homes. From what you’re describing below it sounds like the homes environment should have been brought to the recommended 30-50% Relative Humidity level “prior” to the flooring being brought in, allowed to be properly acclimated and installed. From what your describing below it sounds like the wood flooring absorbed excess high humidity levels that were in the home at that time either while the flooring was originally being acclimated to be installed or after it was installed, expanded in size and is now drying out (contracting in size) to the current homes RH level leaving you with open gaps between boards and damage to the face of the of the boards. As Jeff Hosking’s article above states it is expected to s
By:
Date: April 17, 2015
Page Rating: (5.0/5)
Comments:
When our new home was built, then installed the hardwood floor PRIOR to the HVAC unit. It was installed in July/Aug in Kansas City (high temps & high humidity) again with NO temp / humidity control at all. Now there are gaps, cracks (face checking) and uneven-ness between boards. New cracks keep showing up. Question -- should the floor be replaced? Will it ever be right?
By:
Date: April 13, 2015
Page Rating: (5.0/5)
Comments:
Very Very important information in the above article. I thank you a lot! The flooring stores that I have gone to never mentioned any of this to me.